47 posts found

The War On Waste - or Why I Focus On Libraries

Skip this if you're not in a philosophical mood. It's a 1000-word soliloquy about personal goals and regrets. Also, despite the next section, I am pro-Microsoft. My personal goal is to make developers happier and more effective on whichever platform(s) allow me to do so.

Read more...

Reading max-width, cross-browser

There are 5 basic ways to access max-width element.currentStyle["max-width"] (IE 6, 9, 10) element.currentStyle.maxWidth (IE 7, 8, 9, 10 & Opera only) window.getComputedStyle(element,null)["max-width"] (IE 9, 10, Chrome & Webkit) window.getComputedStyle(element,null).maxWidth (IE 9, 10, Firefox, Opera, Chrome & Webkit) window.getComputedStyle(element,null).getPropertyValue("max-width") (IE 9, 10, Firefox, Opera, Chrome & Webkit) Test results All BrowserStack browsers were tested for all methods.

Read more...

The Pixel Density Explosion

Back in mid-2012, we didn't have that many unique pixel density values; just 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.25, plus variations based on zoom size. Since then, we've had an explosion of devices with high-resolution displays (adding 1.75, 2.5, 3, etc) and this continues to grow.

Read more...

Why don't we have CSS 'image-fit' yet?

When both width and height are specified for an image, the standard behavior is to stretch the image to fit the new aspect ratio. I'm highly curious if image distortion has ever been a useful behavior pattern.

Read more...

Setting up a new rMBP for Ruby development

I've had the same filesystem for roughly 7 years, copying it across 4 hard drives and 2 laptops, and installing 4 new OS versions along the way without a clean install. Both my Mid 2012 17" MBP and my new 15" rMBP have 512GB SDD drives, but according to BlackMagic, the rMBP is 2-4x faster on both reads and writes.

Read more...

A Year and Change

It's been over a year since my last blog post. I can place some of the blame on Wordpress, for having endless issues each time I update it, but mostly it's my own fault. Over a year ago, I decided to migrate from Wordpress to a simple git-based CMS called Nesta.

Read more...

Dynamic seam carving with ImageResizer

Version 3.0.11 version of ImageResizer supports dynamic seam carving (content-aware image resizing) and remote image resizing. Seam carving allows low-energy (unimportant) parts of the image to be removed in order to shrink an image.

Read more...

jCrop and ASP.NET server-side image resizing combined

Today, I'm going to show you how to combine jQuery, jCrop, and ImageResizing.Net to create an AJAX cropping interface - in 11 lines of javascript. This produces true, cropped images that you can use anywhere on the site simply by referencing the generated URL.

Read more...

Image Resizer v2.8 is released - end of line

This is a high-priority update for users of v2, as it blocks a potential avenue for a DOS attack and fixes many important bugs. This is probably the last update the v2 line will receive. v2.X is deprecated and discontinued, and support for it will be ending June 15, 2011.

Read more...

ImageResizer v3 is released

Image Resizer 3 launched on April 24th. New version, new architecture, new website. Now that the initial sprint is over,  things have settled down, and I have a nice set of documentation articles, I'm finally blogging about it.

Read more...

Image Resizer in Action!

I've seen some neat things done with the resizer, but I want to hear more! Put a link to your website and a description of how you are using it in the Comments section. Here's some stuff I've seen: Weather imagery manipulation Real estate photograph and mapping Photography sites Product catalogs Social networking sites Integration into a variety of CMSes (DotNetNuke and a few others I can't remember) However you are using it, whatever you are doing - show us!

Read more...

Version 2.6 released!

It's been almost a year since the last version was released. In a way, it's good - the last version was very stable and secure. In the last year, hundreds of customers have bought and installed the product, and less than a dozen have encountered any bugs.

Read more...

Merging ComputerLinguist.com

In August 2008 I started a separate blog, ComputerLinguist.com. At the time, I felt that it was best to keep my ASP.NET writings separate from the rest. Dynamic languages were still heresy among many programming circles, and my articles on general programming were definitely targeted towards a different audience.

Read more...